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today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
it in perspective. the euro/u.s. dollar didn't move that much whatsoever. from that point of view, i don't think that we just have to look at today or the last two days of development in euro/u.s. dollar. of course, global trade is really important for the german economy. it continues to be very important. even from a private consumption point of view, we did have quite a bit of support as of late. also because of the wages. and looking at the world bank report, also looking at the asian economies in 2013, 2014, them seeing a little better picture is very good for the german economy and not to speak about the turnaround in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a
. these are your headlines from around the world. >> with just one week to go before the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, lawmakers are pointing fingers and playing the blame game. >> mario monti is saying he's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and th
finds. we see falling u.s. demand, rising supply. we see miles driven. there's technology at play. probably the biggest thing that could happen to the auto industry and we can come on to that. that's only a few years out. the message from the futures market that we're get sg oil should be some $10 to $15 lower. if we were to get $10 off the oil price, it broadly equate toes about 1% gdp surprising the western world. it's that time of year where we're pending our thoughts to next year. tangible, economic prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been trying to pull. but your point is interesting. it's not just the uk we were seeing there. and it goes back to the point you were making about oil. u.s. retail gas prices are down 16% since their peak this
to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but again, this is all dependent on what happens with that ongoing debt crisis and any step back in resolving that would obviously have a knock-on effect to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
target. talks about the level of u.s. production, rivalries between iran and saudi arabia, and a new secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is say
:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appears less rose city. we'll speak to a moody's analyst that says high duration credit could be badly exposed. the european central bank is announcing either monetary policy decisions later today. economists expect ecb to stay pat on rates. its revised down its forecasts in 2013. hot on the heels from her stint in brusselss, silvia has moved back to frankfurt and the ecb headquarters. how more pessimistic might they be today in their forecasts. >> that's the big question. if they get too clee to the zero for the forecast next year, anything below let's say 0.4, 0.3 would be considered a little bit more bearish and that would of course increase the chances or risks whatever you want to look at it for further rate cut somewhere down the pike early next year, maybe january or february. the consensus for today is as you said no change on rates. remember a month ago, there were many calling for rate cut this month, but that seems to have receded right now. maybe also because the data we see out of the eurozone is rather mixed. everybody quite agrees that foir
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
people at a u.s. military base. >> the man blew up a car packed with explosives. police say at least six others were injured. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack, which came just days after a shooting inside police headquarters. the egyptian president has signed into law a controversial new constitution after official confirmation should a clear majority for the document in a referendum. >> morsi is due to address parliament on saturday after appointing 90 members to the senate. >> critics say the new basic law is islamist and undemocratic. >> the opposition kept up its protest for weeks, but it was not enough. anchor fled on the streets of cairo after official results were announced. critics say the referendum was marred by fraud. am i in my opinion, the revolution continues, and the constitution does not exist. a constitution has to be for everyone, not split the people of egypt. >> everybody knows the results are wrong. i will continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met. >> egypt's election commission says nearly 64% of voters approved the constitution i
national defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states"
on a rampage at a sikh temple. u.s. army veteran wade michael page. after shooting one police officer multiple times -- page was shot and killed by another officer. number eight, the massacre in khandahar province. >> the united states takes this as seriously as if it was our own citizens and our own children who were murdered. >> the accused gunman, robert bailes. bailes left his afghanistan outpost on a night back in march and single handedly attacked two villages. opening fire and killing 16 afghan civilians in their homes and wounding six others. number seven, striking a deal in the shooting that struck a blow to the nation. >> the man who shot congresswoman gabrielle giffords and killed six people in a ra rampage in tucson last year pleaded guilty to 19 charges. >> jared loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life terms and 140 years. his guilty plea means he will avoid the death penalty. chicago's murder rate surged to levels not seen in almost a decade. >> it's just not the gang bangers. right now, innocent kids and women are being shot on a daily basis. >> averaging more than a mu
, new debates today about gun control and domestic violence. you'll hear both. but first, the u.s. has long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concerns that chemical arsenal is on the move. secretary of state hillary clinton today issuing another stern warning against syria, using these weapons. the syrian foreign ministry quick to respond here saying it would not use chemical weapons against its people if it had any, but this announcement as turkey is sending warplanes to its border with syria after the syrian military bombed a nearby town of ras al-ain. you can hear that and see the smoke. this is the turkish side of the border. this is fueling more fears that more of syria's violence will spill into its neighbor to the north, being turkey. security concerns are prompting the u.n. to announce it is pulling nonessential personnel out of syria. want to bring in fran townsend, our cnn national security contributor and member of the cia external advisory committee. and, fran, good to see you. let's talk about these chemical weapons because we know that in th
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
-- but it is happening. but you would take note and stop to think about it anymore. >> 2012 here in the u.s. gave us a glimpse of the sort of future that is in store if we do not do something to avert -- if we don't shift away from business as usual. we saw record temperatures last summer. we saw record drought for large for the country. in colorado, that came together with record fuel. because of the pine bark beetle infestation, due to record warm winters, it was literally a perfect storm of macroclimate's and assesses the came together to bring this wildfire. we saw american storm. and hurricane. it broke previous records and flooding in new york city. and there's certainly a climate change in the sense that, from the 13 -- at least 1 foot of that would have saved lives. that is the difference between a bad and a disastrous flooding event. that storm was sitting over near-record temperatures. we saw that a year ago. warm temperatures were sitting off the east coast of the u.s. it was a slower-moving storm and is the goal of the moisture, leading to record flooding over a large part of the western
casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejectionist camp that launched permanent hostilities. no arab regime would speak openly about peace with israel. the official charter of the palestinian liberation organization called for replacement with a palestinian state. his chief tactic was terrorism. against israelis, europeans and americans. today the soviet union has collapsed, hussein is gone. syrian regime is teetering. israel has grown to become a regional military super power. it's defense budget is larger now than that of all its neighbors put together. its technological advantages put it in another league. the palestinian authority affirms israel's existence and works with it regularly. iran remains a threat. it is isolated, contained by few other countries in history. the
losses this almost four years. u.s. equity futures, though, not too bad so far today. indicated up about 15 points. today is thursday, december 6th, penultimate day before the day of infamy. "squawk box" begins right now. >> welcome to "squawk box." i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew ross sorkin is on vacation this week. onset with us is drew mattis. welcome. thanks for getting up early. >> i'm always up at this time. >> we'll be going through secretary geithner's comments, but first let's get you up to speed on other stories. joe was talking about apple. it has been a rough ten weeks for the most valuable u.s. company. shares tumbling more than 6% yesterday shedding $35 billion of market value. among the reasons cited by analysts, a forecast by an influential research firm suggesting that the iphone and ipad maker is continuing to give up ground it rival the android gadgets. there were also unconfirmed reports that at least one major stock clearing house was raising margin requirements. and then there's the fiscal cliff. analysts citing fears about a hike in capital gains tax
it is manufacturing, but is there really a demand question about apple's products that is a real one? >> not in the u.s., but there could be some questions about china, remember that report from steve milanovich? he said apple needs to come up within some real innovations, you need to have some clarity on the pipeline, and you need geographic -- clearance to go into china? yes, it got it with two of the smaller carriers. china confirms talks with apple. but the problem here, he says tech is not an issue, it's mainly about the business model and benefit sharing issues. that could be a problem. >> he is also playing the part of what many analysts are doing, which is let me explain why it's going down, in the same way that the death cross, i always love the death cross, this is a technical term. i can think of a million reasons to sell it. the only reason i want to own it is because it makes the best products in the world and it's inexpensive. >> that's a lot of people looking at the chart. >> look again, the people who own apple, they were the ones who owned it because it was going up. it reminds me very
. they weren't always investing in american workers. they certainly weren't willing to make them in the u.s. auto industry. remember, it was just a few years ago that our auto industry was on the verge of collapse. gm, chrysler were all on the brink of failure. and if they failed, the suppliers and distributors that get their business from those companies, they would have died off, too. even ford could have gone down -- production halted. factories shuttered. once proud companies chopped up and sold off for scraps. and all of you -- the men and women who built these companies with your own hands -- would have been hung out to dry. and everybody in this community that depends on you -- restaurant owners, storekeepers, bartenders -- their livelihoods would have been at stake, too. so i wasn't about to let that happen. i placed my bet on american workers. we bet on american ingenuity. i'd make that same bet any day of the week. [applause] three and a half years later, that bet is paying off. this industry has added over a quarter of a million new jobs. assembly lines are humming again. the ame
number of attacks, members by afghan security services against nato or u.s. troops assets in the region. so far this year 60 of those attacks, that is almost three times the number we saw in 2011. right now 65,000 american soldiers inside afghanistan plus thousands more of military contractors and civilian contractors that is what joseph griffin was. he was there working inside afghanistan trying to help the afghan police rebuild and that is when he was killed by a woman in her 30s. she was a member of the afghan police, an iranian national. somehow she up haved through the vetting process of the afghan police and the fact that there are so many holes in the vetting process that they would miss, this woman, for example, who had forged documents is making a lot of people very concerned about what happens going forward, especially over the next couple of years as the u.s. draws down towards 2014 when they turn afghanistan back over to the afghans. that is when you're relying on the afghan security services to go ahead and try to take the lead in fighting the taliban, also in fighting al q
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul
's been a gang buster year for the markets. unfortunately, the average u.s. investor out there has largely been on the sidelines. money in bonds, money into money market funds continuing to flow in the month of november. unfortunately, even as we do see a very, very good year for the stock market, not many investors are really taking part in this. >> i think we saw finally an outflow for bond funds in well over a year last week. that has been a rarity. we've warned many of our viewers, be careful of the duration risk. we're going into another year where many people are at least saying, okay, is the rally over? the 30-year rally in bonds, is it over? if it is, what is it going to mean? we've had people saying that the last three years. everybody's best trade was to short the long bond. it ended up being one of the worst trades you could make the last couple of years. >> in terms of being careful, speaking of being careful, today will be light volume, shortened session, but light volume. who knows what that could lead to. if you wanted bury bad news, christmas eve is the perfect day to do it
have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23. nonetheless, we sit and -- we continue to urge, ugandan officials that -- to make sure that supplies do not originate or travel through that territory. and we have not limited our response to di
intervention, more than half say the u.s. and other countries should not send military planes and missiles to help the opposition fighters set up a safety zone. >>> in kabul earlier today an afghan police officer shot and killed an american contractor. this was inside police headquarters. this attack comes just a day after five afghan police, they were killed by their commander who police say was a taliban infiltrator. more than 50 have been killed by inside attacks this year. barbara starr, this is one of the main concerns as you know of the police of the forces, the international forces inside of afghanistan. you've got these rouge actors that infiltrate and are a part of killing what they -- these inside killings, the green on blue and blue on blue. tell us what happened. >> there's very little information available so far, suzanne. as you said, someone in an afghan police uniform. what is so interesting about this tragic incident is it was a woman in an afghan police uniform. whether she was a member of the afghan police or perhaps an infiltrator that stole the uniform somehow i think
as a former businessman, now a freshman u.s. senator. is this what you thought the job was going to be like as a u.s. senator? >> well, obviously i was kind of hoping we would win in november 2012 here, and we'd actually have a majority in the senate and we could work toward pro growth tax reform. i realized what a mess washington is, and it's one of the things i really would ask the american public to really consider is, you know, what actually works. your former guest was talking about this. families work. communities work. private businesses work. what doesn't work very well is the fatigue. i don'federal government. i don't know why anybody wants to increase its size. >> greta: one of the things there's so little focus on whether it's republicans or democrats is our inner cities like detroit. they're going to explode, implode on us. they'll ultimately be a huge financial drain on the whole federal budget in some ways. it doesn't seem to me there's enough reaching down to find inspiring good ways to invigorate those communities and get growth in those communities and really fix them. i do
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
. -- and 2008. the u.s. utilizing its trade deficit with the rest of the world has been operating like a huge vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the -- entering recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by -- and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. -- ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came o
national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the u.s. house will be gaveling back in in a couple of minutes, 1:45 eastern, and will be voting on federal energy efficiency laws. several governors, members of the national governors association are on capitol hill this afternoon discussing the pending tax hikes and budget cuts, what's known as the fiscal cliff. and they're talking about the economy as well with the senate majority leader, harry reid, and house speaker, john boehner. this after a 90-minute meeting with president obama at the white house this morning where they called for a quick resolution. the governors spoke to reporters at the white house for 15 minutes after that meeting and we'll show you as much as we can until the house gavels in in just a few minutes. >> well, goorn, everybody. i'm jack, the chair of the national governors association, the governor of delaware, joined by governor fallen of oklahoma, she's the vice chair -- governor fallin of oklahoma, she's the vice chair. the governor of arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
more than any other. >> what you're looking at here is the grant of honoring u.s. citizenship to winston churchill and of course you have there the citation signed by president kennedy and then the u.s. passport which sadly wynton churchill never used. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually r
and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please join and then taking the panelists. [applause] >> every weekend book tv offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> now from a conference on the 60th anniversary of the publication of whitaker chambers witness, a panel entitled without anti communism what defines conservatives to that. it's about an hour. >> so could not help remember someone was talking about the adulation which the world health i don't know if everyone here is aware. in august educational institution not too far from here, a bard college, there is actually in alger humanities. my colleague the
and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cas
clinton made a huge statement today. but the u.s. has to be the leader on syria. >> there are human rights abuses ploding all over the world. in uganda there is a bill that is a homosexual bill that would make those acts punishable by death. >> right here we are working on the farm worker's bill. >> as a kennedy, what do you make of what is going on in washington? >> well, i think it is very, very hard with the tea party. they came to washington to destroy it. >> the american people have spoken and everybody missed teddy. he was great friends with people on both sides of the aisle. >> the rfk center, let's turn to more cheery things. >> if you are watching, get out there and get on that website and bid higher. there is a signed taylor swift guitar. and fly fishing. >> and it is a great cause. and finally, let's come to this car accident that you had. because it was a strange case where you had taken an ambien sleeping pill in the morning. >> yes, i reached for my thyroid medication and took the wrong pills. i was on my way to the gym and got into the car and got into a
about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little b
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
in america. there are more of his works in the u.s. than anywhere but britain. he influenced american painters such as frederic edwin church... and thomas moran, who became known as "the american turner." french painters, including claude monet, were also intrigued by him. monet saw an exhibition of turner's works in london in the early 1870s and noted with approval that the english artist "painted with his eyes open." the impressionists admired his ability to capture luminous atmospheric effects. by the end of the 19th century, j.m.w. turner's dream was realized-- landscape painting was elevated to a level unthinkable without the contributions he had made in fifty years of painting.
. the only reason they're not going to use it is because somebody else, the u.s., has a similar threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner, you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they caus
hosni mubarak. critics say he's rushing through a constitution with an islamic agenda. >>> u.s. and russian senior diplomats will meet today with the united nations peace envoy for syria in an attempt to end the civil war there. this comes as pentagon sources tell nbc news there is intelligence suggesting the syrian government has loaded sarin gas into aerial bombs and awaiting command from president assad for its use. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the san francisco chronicle," american jazz legend dave brubeck died just short of his 92nd birthday. he redefined american jazz in the 1950s and '60s, and he was a jazz pop star of sorts. "take five" became the first jazz recording to sell over a million copies. it made jazz popular in the united states. dave brubeck dying yesterday. >> a great musician. >> little-known fact, the guy that played stand-up bass for him the last ten years, mike allen. >> is that right? >> nobody knew that. allen. yes, he plays it and spins that thing around. >> oh, i love when he does that, slaps the back of it. >> he also, for a year and a half,
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
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